Saturday, September 27, 2008

Guest Blogger Susan Reports from Ole Miss









My good friend Susan teaches social work at Ole Miss, scene of last night's presidential debate. With her permission, I am reprinting part of an email she sent to family and friends, and some photos from campus yesterday. Thanks, Susan! I am so proud that social workers have always been on the forefront of creating change and you are preparing the next generation to carry it on.

Live from the Grove at the University of Mississippi: "I cannot tell you how exciting it was today to be in the midst of history. I went up to the Grove at 10 as social work students were in Issues Alley addressing poverty. I went intending to only stay a couple of hours to support the students, but got so caught up in it I ended up staying until 4:30. It was just incredible, the energy and excitement, talking to people, marching together, seeing people walk by who nodded support, took pictures. Folks with all kinds of issues present! It was just great to be with my colleagues today, and students, and see other people of like mind. I have come to love Mississippi and the hope for a better future here for our children. I was caucus leader yesterday in the Mississippi Youth and Children Convention, addressing major concerns affecting children in Mississippi and the nation. Then today, to actually be in the midst of all the people who are working for change was incredible."


4 comments:

Susan said...

Thanks for sharing, Jane! It was really incredible to see so many young people energized. One group actually walked from Memphis to the campus! (Memphis is a one hour drive, so have no idea how long it took them to walk it. James Meredith started with them in Memphis, but did not complete the whole trip. Of course, he is in his 70s now.

Kristinn said...

I love that "We need a poverty bailout" sign!!!

Gigi said...

Me, too. That and "Rednecks for Obama" are my favorites!

Susan said...

Those guys were great! They were union, so there has always been a connection there in issues of concern to social workers, of course. Reminded me of our time with Si Kahn and his talking about his union organizing work and getting blacks and whites together in the south.